12 July, 2010

Anne Parrish Book Coincidence

Anne Parrish book: Floating IslandThis is one of those classic coincidences which seems to check out okay. It's about the American author Anne Parrish. She wrote novels and also children's literature, such as Floating Island, and lived from 1888 to 1957 - so, yes, it's an old coincidence!

In the 1920s Anne was in Paris with her husband, the industrialist Charles Corliss, and they were browsing the local bookshops. While doing so she picked up a well worn copy of one of her own childhood all time favourites called Jack Frost and Other Stories.

She handed the book to her husband saying how much she loved the book as a child. He flipped open the book and to their amazement on the fly leaf was written: 'Anne Parrish, 209 N. Weber Street, Colorado Springs, Colorado' Yes, it was her very own book!

Goodness knows how Jack Frost got to Paris, but it nicely linked Anne Parrish with her childhood. This theme happens time after time in the world of coincidence and synchronicity.

Books:
Floating Island by Anne Parrish

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8 comments:

  1. how on earth do such things happen. maybe not earthly but something greater.

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  2. Certainly one of the classics. It was as if the book had a life of its own.

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  3. I guess it was meant to find it's way back home.

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  4. Million to one things happen everyday. None that remarkable in the grand scheme of things. It is only when we apply our own human need for the miraculous do we see miracles. One avid reader and writer finds a book she owned in a second had shop. So? She probably visits these shops all the time, likely she is well travelled. Authors and such do this all the time so one was bound to have such an experience sooner or later. So please don't impart the occurrences with some sort of otherworldly or supernatural explanation. It's a cute story but not at all amazing or weird. We beat massively higher odds to be here on this amazing planet so see wonder in that not this nonsense. It was delightful for the person as a personal experience and should have stayed that way.

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  5. David is quite right. Anne Parrish picked up that title not at random but precisely because she had owned a copy during her childhood. Certainly it was a striking coincidence that it should be the very same one. But on the continuum from rationally explicable to creepy-spooky we can only place the explanation at the former end.

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  6. ✫ Let's be logical for a moment and put a bit of problem solving using the law of parsimony to use here. "Occam's razor" states (in a nutshell) That when you have a competition of hypotheses about a circumstance such as this, the one with the fewest assumptions is the more likely.

    So, taking the aforementioned into thought, mathematically speaking, out of the billions of people who have had books which ultimately got sold, donated, stolen or lost, of which many end up in book stores, I would find it more amazing if this DID NOT happen every once and a while.

    Occasionally the complicated, mysterious and fantastical assumptions may prove to be correct however more often than not, the fewer assumptions that are made, the better the chance of being correct.

    As an example, of 1 or 2 which is the easiest to assume?

    ✔1. A book traveled across the planet, avoiding disaster and purchase and many years after her youth she ended up in the same bookstore, at the same time that the book was there, finding her treasured childhood book.

    ✔2. She is a liar or her husband played a trick on her.

    Why choose to believe 1 over 2? It's more fun to believe in 1 but is it intelligent sense?

    Hope you enjoyed my thoughts, lmk what you think : )

    BradSaintGeorge.com

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  7. This stuff happens to me all the time.

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